Research Archives - Michigan Head & Spine Institute Blog

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Spinal fractures can be extremely painful. Often, osteoporosis or osteopenia can be the cause of these compression fractures within the vertebra of the spine. These are sometimes referred to as osteoporotic compression fractures due to loss of bone strength in the mid to lower back.

Women more often than men experience these fractures. This condition can occur without a specific injury or be caused by trauma or cancer of the spine. Older women in the Midwest, who have less exposure to the sun and absorb less Vitamin D, are more likely to experience compression fractures.

Kyphoplasty is a painless procedure performed in the office under local anesthesia. Compression fractures often cause a decrease of height or forward rounding of the spine. Kyphoplasty can quickly relieve the pain caused by this condition.

To learn more about how compression fractures affect the vertebrae, watch this educational video.

Todd Nida, M.D., explains the procedure of Kyphoplasty, “First, a balloon is used to expand the disc and vertebral space and removed. Then a surgical glue or cement is used to ‘unscrunch’ the compressed area of the spine.” Dr. Nida says, “the pain is almost immediately relieved, and most patients return to their regular activities the next day.”

Dr. Nida explains the minimally invasive procedure that treats spine fractures caused by osteoporosis to provide rapid back pain relief and straighten the spine.

 

Christine, a patient of Daniel Fahim, M.D., explains her experience with Kyphoplasty after experiencing seven very painful compression fractures in her mid and lower back brought her life to a halt. After Kyphoplasty, she says, “I’m back” with the goal of walking 20 miles a day in a local breast cancer fundraising walk.

Watch Christine’s story below:

If you have osteoporosis or osteopenia with sudden onset pain in the mid or lower part of the spine it could be a compression fracture. To request a consultation with an MHSI neurosurgeon, call 248-784-3667 or request an appointment at MHSI.us.

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Over two-thirds of individuals experience chronic low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime, according to the New England Journal of Medicine. Some of the most common causes of low back pain include the biochemical degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD), spinal stenosis, and disc herniation. For these individuals, posterolateral and interbody fusion techniques are frequently considered for those with one- or two-level degenerative disc disease whose symptoms are unresponsive to conservative treatment. Nevertheless, pre-operative diagnostic techniques that may identify those patients with degenerative disc disease without significant neurological compression who may benefit from surgical intervention remain elusive.

Henry C. Tong, M.D., Daniel K. Fahim, M.D., and Mick Perez-Cruet, M.D., of MHSI and their colleague at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Mengqiao Alan Xi, BSc, recently published their research that re-evaluated the effectiveness of lumbar discography with post-discography CT.

Their study results indicate that discography with post-discography CT can be an effective method to evaluate patients with discogenic back pain refractory to non-operative treatments. Those patients with one- or two-level high concordant pain scores with associated annular tears and negative control disc represent good surgical candidates for lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

To read the full study, click this link.


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Jeffrey Jacob, M.D.
Jeffrey Jacob, M.D.

Jeffery Jacob, M.D., along with his former Mayo Clinic colleagues in the Department of Neurosurgery and Anesthesia.  The article was published in Neurology, Sept. 8, 2015, which presented findings from a study on obese patients undergoing elective spinal fusion.

The objective of the study was on the impact of obesity on resource utilization and early complications in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spine disease.

The conclusions drawn from this single-institution retrospective analysis is that increased BMI is associated with longer operative times, increased complication rates and increased cost independent of co-morbidities. The results further indicated the need for preoperative weight loss.